Veganism Is On The Rise!

Hi Everyone,

Scientific research is providing hard facts that if everyone moderately reduced their consumption of meats and dairy products, this wold have a positive impact on global warming and reduce the need for mass farming of animals.

Okay going Vegan is the extreme end to make an immediate impact, below are some hard fact to consider:

source: https://www.vegansociety.com/news/media/statistics

Treatment of animals

Cows

  • Dairy cows have been modified to produce up to 10 times more milk than they naturally would.
  • Male calves are of no use to the dairy industry and are less suitable for beef production. This means that every year around 90,000 male dairy calves are shot soon after birth and discarded as a by-product.
  • Domesticated cows have an average lifespan of 20 years, but on dairy farms they are killed after 5-6 years on average.
  • 30% of UK dairy cows have mastitis, a bacterial infection of the udder. 

Chickens and other birds

  • Every year in the UK we slaughter around 950 million birds for food consumption, including chickens, ducks and turkeys.
  • 90% of chicken production in the UK is in intensive windowless sheds which house 20,000-50,000 chickens each. 
  • 51% of eggs produced come from chickens in battery cages.
  • 40 million day-old male chicks are killed in the UK by either being gassed or being thrown into a macerator – this practice occurs in all egg farming systems, including organic and free-range. 
  • Beak trimming is the permanent removal of part of the beak of a bird at a young age. This is standard industry practice in the UK despite being illegal in many European countries due to the pain it inflicts. 
  • A free-range egg farmer can legally house 16,000 birds in one building, meaning that they can house 9 birds per square metre of space. This means that free-range hens live out their entire lives in an overcrowded indoor farming unit.

Pigs

  • Less than 3% of UK pigs spend their entire lives outdoors. 
  • 1/3 of pigs in the UK are killed in gas chambers. 
  • Around half of all antibiotics sold in the UK are used on farmed animals, with 60% of these being used on pigs.
  • Most pigs are entitled to less than one square metre of space each and the majority of sows (female breeding pigs) are kept in farrowing crates. Farrowing crates were made illegal in several countries across Europe, but are still standard farming practice here in the UK.

Fish and other sea animals

  • 3/4 of the world’s fisheries are either exploited or depleted.
  • We kill between 1 and 2.8 trillion fish every year. This is 143-400x the amount of the entire human population. 
  • 308,000 cetaceans are unintentionally drowned each year after becoming entangled in fishing equipment. 
  • Farmed salmon has 10x the amount of cancer-causing organic pollutants than wild salmon. 
  • For every pound of fish caught, up to 5 pounds of unintended marine species are caught and discarded as by-kill. 
  • Sharks kill 12 people per year. People kill 11,414 sharks per hour. 

Sheep

  • Around 1.4 million sheep and goats are killed without being stunned each year in the UK using halal practices. Many people in the UK oppose this form of slaughter, yet purchase halal meat unknowingly, since it is sold in most major outlets, including supermarkets and takeaways, without always being labelled as halal. 
  • Every year around 4 million newborn lambs die within a few days of birth, mainly because of malnutrition, disease or exposure to cold weather. 
  • Male lambs are castrated using elastration, a technique that involves a thick rubber band being placed around the base of the infant’s scrotum, obstructing the blood supply and causing atrophy. This method causes severe pain to the lambs who are provided no pain relief during the process. Lambs also have their tails docked using the same method. 
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Exploring Vegan Substitutes

Many people still think there are no suitable alternatives to replace the experience of eating meat or diary products when you are a Vegan. Well, there are actually plenty of options. Below are a list great alternatives to to replace meats and diary products..Vegan style!!

Source: https://www.cookstr.com/Cooking-Tips/Vegan-Substitutions

1.Egg Re-placers

Applesauce
Egg substitutions don’t get much simpler than applesauce. About 3-4 tablespoons will replace one egg in your baked goods. Just remember that applesauce does have a sweetness to it and acidity that isn’t present in regular eggs, so you may have to adjust other parts of the recipe you’re using to account for this.

Bananas
Great for making fall desserts, bananas are a staple ingredient substitution for any vegan baker. The ratio is basically 1 banana to 1 egg. The fibrous nature of bananas makes them great binding agents for your baked goods, but the texture might be a little thicker than you’re expecting. If you’re having trouble getting the bananas to break up entirely when you mix them into your ingredients, consider mashing them up thoroughly before adding them to the rest of your ingredients.

Purees
If you’ve ever made a dump cake, you’re probably aware that purees and pie fillings make great replacements for eggs and other binding agents. Plus, it’s a great way to improvise with your recipes, adding in new flavors and making truly unique recipes.

Silken Tofu
Tofu is probably the closest thing you will find to an all-encompassing egg replacer. The other alternatives have pretty limited uses — applesauce and “flegg” for instance can really only be used as egg replacements in baking. But with the right kinf of seasoning and spices and with a close eye on the cooking, you can actually use silken tofu to create a vegan version of scrambled eggs!

2. Milk Re-placers

Soy Milk, Hemp Milk, and Rice Milk
Vegan milk substitutes basically fall into two categories — nut milk and other plant-based milks. Soy milk was once the kind of the vegan milk world but has recently lost some steam to newer, “hipper” alternatives like hemp milk and rice milk. The best part about these substitutes, though, is that you can use them to replace the milk that’s called for in the recipe with a simple 1:1 ratio. No math necessary!

Almond Milk and Other Nut-Based Milks
By far the most popular type of plant-based milk, almond milk is loved be vegans and meat-eaters like because it’s just so good! Whether you use it to replace regular milk in your baked goods or pour it over your cereal, almond milk is praised as the “good kind of fat” alternative to cow’s milk.

Substitutes for Buttermilk
Sometimes the recipe you’re working with calls for buttermilk, and your instinct might simply be to replace it with one of the plant-based milks listed above. Don’t be fooled — there’s a difference between milk and buttermilk. Buttermilk has higher levels of acidity, which means that it will react differently with other ingredients. To substitute buttermilk, simply add about 1 tsp of vinegar for every cup of plant-based milk.

Meat Re-placers

Tofu and Tempeh
Tofu is the classic meat substitute. It’s spongy texture and ability to absorb flavors make it great for replacing almost any meat imaginable with the right seasoning. Tofu is a great place to start for beginner vegan chefs because it’s pretty easy to handle, too. Similarly, tempeh is a soy-based meat substitute that’s versatile and absorbs flavors well. You can do just about anything with it that you can do with real meat.

Seitan
Like tofu and tempeh, seitan is a flexible meat substitute that tastes delicious and goes with just about anything. The main difference between tofu and seitan is that seitan is made from wheat gluten instead of soy. Seitan is particularly good for substituting chicken.

Beans
For the protein-conscious vegans out there, replacing meat with beans is super easy and super delicious. While it’s not always true that vegans have trouble getting protein in their diets, people who highly active lifestyles do require higher amounts of protein. Consider replacing ground beef for tacos and burritos with beans for a meaty flavor that’s both affordable and a great source of plant-based protein.

Eggplant
You’ve probably heard of eggplant parmesan, but the options for this versatile vegetable don’t stop there. You can cut them into chunks, sautee them, and even slice them into thin, burger-like pieces. Their neutral flavor and thick texture make them great for absorbing savory flavors and creating a convincing meat substitute.

Mushrooms
Another staple of any vegan produce drawer is mushrooms. They have a naturally savory and meat-like flavor, so it doesn’t take a lot of work to transform them into a meat substitute. Use them to replace chicken in stir fry or mince them finely, sautee them, and add them to your tacos.

Jackfruit
That’s right — fruit. Jackfruit is the hottest trend in the vegan and vegetarian worlds because of its ability to transform when cooked. You might not always find it in your normal grocery store, but if you have an Asian or “international” market near you, you can easily find jackfruit. The pieces of fruit are stringy on the inside, and when cooked, their flavor becomes neutral. Just throw on some barbecue sauce, and you’ve got a recipe for vegan pulled-pork that will fool even the biggest meat eaters.

3. Cheese Re-placers

Tofu Cheese
The soft but malleable texture of tofu makes it a great base for your cheese substitutes. Of course, tofu on its own doesn’t necessarily create the most amazing tasting cheeses. We recommend experimenting with flavors and spices to create a convincing cheese alternative that tastes just like real cheese.

Nutritional Yeast
Sold in a powdered, flaky form, nutritional yeast is entirely plant-based, and it has a uniquely cheesy flavor. It can be hard to put your finger on what exactly nutritional yeast tastes, like, but when you add it to your dishes, you will definitely notice a difference. Plus, as the name suggests, there are tons of health benefits of nutritional yeast.

Cashew Cheese
You read that right — cashew cheese. When soaked in water, cashews become very soft and flexible, which means they can easily be blended into a smooth paste. Their neutral, nutty flavor means they can absorb flavors well. A little nutritional yeast and some herbs and spices added to these blended cashews will create a cheesy spread that’s hard to resist.

Potato and Carrot Cheese
It doesn’t get much easier than this, folks. Potatoes (or sweet potatoes) and carrots blended in the blender until they’re nice and smooth make an amazing base for vegan nacho cheese. The spicier, the better!

4.Butter Re-placers

Coconut Oil
For cooking, sauteeing, baking, and more, coconut oil should be in every vegan chef’s pantry. It melts easily, so you can use it for greasing a pan or even just as a 1:1 substitute for butter in baked goods. If you’re feeling really brave, try coconut oil on your morning toast.

Vegetable Oil
Because vegetable oil is… well, oil, it’s hard to use it for much of anything besides baking. You can use it as a substitute for melted or softened butter in recipes, but if the recipe calls for you to “cut in” the butter or just a regular stick of butter, vegetable oil is probably not your best option.

5. Honey Re-placers

1. Agave Nectar
2. Maple Syrup
3. Coconut Nectar

All the above re-placers when used correctly will give you the same enjoyment as if you were eating the real thing. Enjoy discovering.

Introduction to Veganism

Hi Everyone,

I thought I’d add a little introduction about becoming a Vegan.

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A vegan diet contains only plants (such as vegetables, grains, nuts and fruits) and foods made from plants.

Vegans don’t eat foods that come from animals, including dairy products and eggs.

Healthy eating as a vegan

You should be able to get most of the nutrients you need from eating a varied and balanced vegan diet.

For a healthy vegan diet:

  • eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day
  • base meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates (choose wholegrain where possible)
  • have some dairy alternatives, such as soya drinks and yoghurts (choose lower fat and lower sugar options)
  • eat some beans, pulses and other proteins
  • choose unsaturated oils and spreads, and eat in small amounts
  • drink plenty of fluids (the government recommends 6 to 8 cups or glasses a day)

If you choose to include foods and drinks that are high in fat, salt or sugar, have them less often and in small amounts.

See the Eatwell Guide for more information about a healthy diet.

It applies to vegetarians, vegans, people of all ethnic origins and those who are a healthy weight for their height, as well as those who are overweight.

The only group it isn’t suitable for is children under 2 years of age, as they have different needs.

Getting the right nutrients from a vegan diet

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs.

If you don’t plan your diet properly, you could miss out on essential nutrients, such as calciumiron and vitamin B12.

Vegan sources of calcium and vitamin D

Calcium is needed for strong and healthy bones and teeth. Non-vegans get most of their calcium from dairy foods (milk, cheese and yoghurt), but vegans can get it from other foods.

Good sources of calcium for vegans include:

  • fortified unsweetened soya, rice and oat drinks
  • calcium-set tofu
  • sesame seeds and tahini
  • pulses
  • brown and white bread (in the UK, calcium is added to white and brown flour by law)
  • dried fruit, such as raisins, prunes, figs and dried apricots

A 30g portion of dried fruit counts as 1 of your 5 A Day, but should be eaten at mealtimes, not as a between-meal snack, to reduce the impact on teeth.

The body needs vitamin D to regulate the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body. These nutrients help keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy.

Good sources of vitamin D for vegans include:

  • exposure to sunlight (particularly from late March/early April to the end of September) – remember to cover up or protect your skin before it starts to turn red or burn (see vitamin D and sunlight)
  • fortified fat spreads, breakfast cereals and unsweetened soya drinks (with vitamin D added)
  • vitamin D supplements

Read the label to ensure the vitamin D used in a product isn’t of animal origin.

Vegan sources of iron

Iron is essential for the production of red blood cells. A vegan diet can be high in iron, although iron from plant-based food is absorbed by the body less well than iron from meat.

Good sources of iron for vegans are:

  • pulses
  • wholemeal bread and flour
  • breakfast cereals fortified with iron
  • dark green leafy vegetables, such as watercress, broccoli and spring greens
  • nuts
  • dried fruits, such as apricots, prunes and figs

Vegan sources of vitamin B12

The body needs vitamin B12 to maintain healthy blood and a healthy nervous system.

It’s only found naturally in foods from animal sources. Sources for vegans are therefore limited and a vitamin B12 supplement may be needed.

Sources of vitamin B12 for vegans include:

  • breakfast cereals fortified with B12
  • unsweetened soya drinks fortified with vitamin B12
  • yeast extract, such as Marmite, which is fortified with vitamin B12

Vegan sources of omega-3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids, primarily those found in oily fish, can help maintain a healthy heart and reduce the risk of heart disease when eaten as part of a healthy diet.

Sources of omega-3 fatty acids suitable for vegans include:

  • flaxseed (linseed) oil
  • rapeseed oil
  • soya oil and soya-based foods, such as tofu
  • walnuts

Evidence suggests that plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids may not have the same benefits in reducing the risk of heart disease as those in oily fish.

But if you follow a vegan diet, you can still look after your heart by eating at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day, cutting down on food that’s high in saturated fat, and watching how much salt you eat.

source:https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/the-vegan-diet/

What’s Really In Meat?

Hi Everyone,

The next time you tuck into your Burger or Sunday Roast, stop for a minute to think about what you are actually eating, especially if it’s not 100% organic.

Below is a list of ten products you will find in all Supermarket meats and regulations allow it to happen.

whats-really-in-my-meat

  1. Arsenic
    Farms feed chickens and pigs arsenic to help ward off infections in their filthy living conditions and to turn the animals’ flesh the pink shade that is considered appetising – because nothing says “appetising” like poison.
  2. Poo
    When animals’ intestines are torn open during slaughter, faeces spill out onto their flesh. So when people buy meat, they’re getting – well, sorry – crappy food.
  3. Industrial runoffWho would head down to the local river, whip out a glass and gulp down some river water? No one? Well, then people might want to avoid eating fish, who are contaminated with the pollutants that run into waterways from our tanneries, factories and industrial plants as well as manure runoff from pastures.
  4. Hormones                                                                                                                                 Did you want a side of HRT with your fish and chips? How about a splash of oestrogen in your milk? Traces of contraceptives and other chemicals in the water supply have led to fish becoming “feminised”, with male fish laying eggs, and cows’ milk comes with an added dose of sex hormones.
  5. Calf-stomach lining

    Many cheeses are made with rennet, an enzyme taken from calves’ stomach lining. Does eating babies’ stomachs make you sick to yours?

    6. Pus

    Cows on dairy farm often suffer from mastitis, a painful inflammation of the udders caused by bacteria. Their bodies try to fight off the infection by producing pus. And guess where the pus goes – into the milk and into the milk-drinker’s mouth.

    7. Parts of a totally different animal

    There could be a horse in your lasagne or a pig in your “beef” meatballs. Given all the recent scandals, we’re just wondering what “surprise” ingredient is going to turn up next.

    8. Drugs

    Lots and lots of drugs. Animals on farms are routinely fed massive doses of antibiotics (even if they’re not sick) with alarming consequences for antibiotic resistance and the emergence of dangerous “superbugs”.

    9. Diseased organs
    If you’ve ever eaten foie gras, you should know that the diabolical “delicacy” is made from the livers of ducks and geese who have been force-fed until they’re desperately ill.                                                                                                                      10. Pink slime

This nauseating paste is made by sending animals’ bones through a machine that                scrapes off the last bits of flesh and blood then treating the resulting mass with                    ammonia and dyes. The “mechanically recovered meat” is the main ingredient of chicken nuggets and other processed meats.

Top Vegan Restaurants

Hi Everyone,

Eating out can be challenging at the best of times for Vegans, however, more and more restaurants and pop-up Vegan chains are opening. As well as established restaurants expanding their menus for Vegans.

Vegan-Restaurants

Below, is a top list of 22 Vegan-friendly restaurants to explore.

1  Wagamama

Wagamama are doing a Vegan Katsu Curry! “The rumours are true. vegan katsu curry has arrived.

Byron

The Beetnik, which they say “comprises a beautifully flavor some beetroot falafel patty, freshly made to Byron’s own recipe and topped with baby kale, smashed avocado, tomato, pickled red onions, red pepper ketchup and a lime-dressed rainbow slaw.”

3  The Real Greek

Dedicated Vegan Menu, packed with thirty, flavor some vegan dishes that pay homage to Greece’s rich heritage of vegan cooking including Jackfruit Stifado and Vegan Moussaka.

4  By Chloe

Vegan fast food chain with several restaurants across the US. Their burgers have previously named the best veggie burgers in New York, and by the look of the Instagram feed, we’ll be queueing round the block for them.

5  Zizzi

Vegan zucca pizza (tomato, mozzarella alternative, roasted butternut squash, caramelised balsamic onions & spinach) and the vegan pepperonata pizza (Tomato, mozzarella alternative, fire-roasted peppers, sunblush tomatoes, hot roquito chillies & pea shoots).

6  Itsu

Itsu have just launched a new hot food menu which features some delicious new vegan options including: Quinoa falafef & veg rice bowl, Veggie gyoza noodles and detox miso!

7  Carluccio’s

The menu at Carluccio’s clearly outlines their vegan options, including a tomato and basil spaghetti, sautéed mushrooms, Carluccio’s salad and a Sicilian aubergine stew.

8  The Diner

The Diner is launching their first all vegan/vegetarian menu, serving everything from vegan pancakes to a dirty burrito and dairy-free mac ‘n’ cheese.

Following the launch at The Strand on the 4th October the exclusive menu will debut at the Islington site from the 10th October.

9  Pizza Hut

Pizza Hut are trialling a vegan cheese option throughout the UK for an eight week period, to see if the meat-free alternative is popular.

10  Firezza

Firezza’s vegan range is a must-taste for anyone lookig to indulge in delicious crispy pizzas topped with vegan cheese and range of animal-free toppings of your choice

11  Las Iguanas

Las Iguanas have a whole menu dedicated to their vegan dishes, including portobello mushroom fajitas, a fiesta ensalada and veggie chilli.

12  Giraffe

Vegan stuff at Giraffe includes the Indo-Coco Curry, the super San Fran salad and edamame tapas – made with soybean pods with chilli, garlic, ginger and soy sauce.

13  Leon

Leon offer the best selection of vegan boxes and sides, as well as sauces, including the quinoa salad shown here, a sweet potato and okra stew and a Brazilian black bean box. The dream.

14 Yo! Sushi

You might think all sushi is raw fish, but that’s definitely not the case at Yo! Sushi – think vegetable tempura, yakisoba and inari and kaiso sushi.

15 Ask Italian

Not only can you make your own vegan pizza at Ask Italian, but they have three pasta options, a salad, starters and desserts that don’t use animal products.

16 Toby Carvery

We’re not joking when we say Toby Carvery offer a seeeeriously good vegan Sunday lunch: lentil cottage pie, butternut squash crumble and spiced chickpea wellington with all the trimmings.

17 Bella Italia

The range at Bella Italia might not be huge, but there’s a vegan salad/pasta/and pasta classico to get your teeth into.

18  Pizza Express

Pizza Express offer various options to make a three-course vegan menu: olivers for starter, the Pianta pizza and the new Coconut Delight pudding – made with coconut shavings and coconut milk.

19 Wetherspoons

On Wetherspoons’ vegan menu, they state that you can ask for loads of their dishes without animal product on. Other vegan dishes include the onion Bhajis, samosas, pomodoro pasta and the hash browns (all you need really).

20  Nando’s

There are quite a lot of options at Nando’s, providing you specify what you do and don’t want. Order the veggie wrap/burger/pitta without the mayo, the quinoa salad without the feta cheese or the portobello mushroom without the halloumi.

21 Prezzo

Vegan at Prezzo? Go for the penne arrabbiata, pappardelle (pictures) or a pizza bjase, which is vegan, without cheese.

22 Wahaca

Although the menu doesn’t specify are things are vegan – but rather says vegetarian – Wahaca’s offerings include plantain tacos, the summer vegetable enchilladas (without cheese) and the cactus/courgette burrito.

 

Top 5 Holiday Cities for Vegans

Hi Everyone,

Its the holiday season, which can be very difficult for the Vegan lifestyle and how you are going to eat and not return from holiday losing physical pounds as in body weight.

Below is a list of top-five Cities for holiday Vegans.

Image result for vegan countries

 1. Taipei, Taiwan

Taiwan has a majority-Buddhist population, so cruelty-free dining is commonplace, and Taipei is particularly has a wide verity of vegan dining possibilities. Vegan restaurants and supermarkets are easy to come by as are vegetarian spots offering plenty of vegan options. Tofu crops up regularly in street food, and a local specialty is the ‘Taiwanese Burrito’ — which consists of vegetables in a peanut sauce, wrapped up burrito-style.

2. Ghent, Belgium

The city has wholeheartedly embraced the meat-free concept, to the extent that ‘Veggie Thursday’ sees school children and public service workers offered entirely meat-free meals once a week. Local cafes and restaurants also offer extra vegetarian options on Thursdays. Ghent local businesses have provided a huge number of organic markets, vegetarian cafes and a largely vegetarian organic supermarket.

3. Edinburgh, Scotland

Named by PETA as the UK’s most vegan-friendly city in 2015, Edinburgh swiped the title from its neighbor Glasgow. Edinburgh offers over 20 vegan venues along with a good selection of meat-and-dairy-free options at most other cafes, bars and restaurants. Vegans can even try vegan haggis.

4. Chennai, India

Almost half the population of India is vegetarian, and while regions in the north often use clarified butter in cooking, the south is more vegan-friendly. Chennai, in particular, has become a destination city for vegan foodies, mainly for the diversity of vegan curries, dosas, thalis, sambhar and chutneys. Chaat — a catch-all term for Southern Indian street food — is very often good to go for vegans, with options including spiced corn and potato-based aloo.

5. Vancouver, Canada

Vancouver is home to vegan shoe stores, bakeries, food trucks, brunch joints, raw food bars and supper clubs. The Acorn is rated among the best restaurants in Canada and, though it’s vegetarian rather than vegan, there are plenty of options here for strict vegos, and the slick decor makes it a good option for a special occasion meal.